Andy Warhol Original Marker Drawing ‘Gun’

75.000,00

Andy Warhol Original Marker Drawing ‘Gun’

Artwork bears the special ‘Studio 54’ logo as a link to Warhol’s regular club visits

Authenticated Warhol artwork from 1954

Ink and watercolor on light/medium paer

Size : 28,7 x 20 cm (11.5¨ x 8¨)

Obsessed with celebrity, consumer culture and mechanical reproduction, pop artist Andy Warhol created some of the most iconic images of the 20th century. He drew extensively on popular culture and everyday subjects in his most famous works: his 32 Campbell’s Soup cans, his Brillo box sculptures and portraits of Marilyn Monroe and Elizabeth Taylor, to name a few.

When the lights were going out all over New York in the late 1970s as a result of the economic and social hardships facing the city, there was one place that acted as a beacon for the city’s brightest creative minds. Beyond Studio 54’s velvet rope lay a debauched world where its patrons could express themselves without reservation and where anything could happen, and usually did. During its heyday in 1977-79 it attracted the glitterati of the New York social scene; Mick and Bianca Jagger, Elizabeth Taylor, Grace Jones, Michael Jackson, Calvin Klein, Elton John, Truman Capote and Jackie Kennedy Onassis.

During one legendary New Year’s Eve party the entire floor of the club was covered with a four-inch layer of glitter, which prompted the co-owner Ian Schrager to declare was like standing on stardust. “People got the glitter in their hair, in their socks. You would see it in people’s homes six months later, and you knew they’d been at Studio 54 on New Year’s” (I. Scharger, quoted by B. Weber).

While many celebrities (including on one infamous occasion, Cher) were deemed unworthy to be granted entry by the club’s legendary co-owner, Steve Rubell, Warhol was welcomed with open arms and would often hold court there surrounded by a retinue of long-time friends and new acquaintances. His diaries are full of entries describing arriving at the club after dinner and spending until the early hours dancing, drinking and enjoying the atmosphere. “Went over to Studio 54,” he wrote in June 1977. “The band struck up ‘New York, New York’ and they carried Liza [Minnelli] in. Halston did photos with her. Then a little later they played “New York, New York” and Martin [Scorsese] walked in, and I think maybe they carried Liza in again or picked her up again, but I was leaving” (A. Warhol, quoted by A. Warhol & P. Hackett (ed.), The Andy Warhol Diaries, New York, 1989, p. 53).

Warhol captured the glamor and excitement of Studio 54 in a series of works based on the club’s VIP ticket. The iconic logo, the disco inspired palette and the expressive energy of Warhol’s painterly additions to his silkscreen process, all speak to the hedonism and excitement of the club and its many devotees. Studio 54 was often the place where Warhol felt his happiest, being the center of attention and thoroughly enjoying the adulation. The key of the success of Studio 54, Warhol once said, is that it’s a dictatorship at the door and a democracy on the dance floor.

Handsigned lower part right

Comes with COA from the Leo Castelli Gallery and Authentication letter from the Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts

Artwork is in mint condition

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Description

Andy Warhol Original Marker Drawing ‘Gun’

Artwork bears the special ‘Studio 54’ logo as a link to Warhol’s regular club visits

Authenticated Warhol artwork from 1954

Ink and watercolor on light/medium paer

Size : 28,7 x 20 cm (11.5¨ x 8¨)

Obsessed with celebrity, consumer culture and mechanical reproduction, pop artist Andy Warhol created some of the most iconic images of the 20th century. He drew extensively on popular culture and everyday subjects in his most famous works: his 32 Campbell’s Soup cans, his Brillo box sculptures and portraits of Marilyn Monroe and Elizabeth Taylor, to name a few.

When the lights were going out all over New York in the late 1970s as a result of the economic and social hardships facing the city, there was one place that acted as a beacon for the city’s brightest creative minds. Beyond Studio 54’s velvet rope lay a debauched world where its patrons could express themselves without reservation and where anything could happen, and usually did. During its heyday in 1977-79 it attracted the glitterati of the New York social scene; Mick and Bianca Jagger, Elizabeth Taylor, Grace Jones, Michael Jackson, Calvin Klein, Elton John, Truman Capote and Jackie Kennedy Onassis.

During one legendary New Year’s Eve party the entire floor of the club was covered with a four-inch layer of glitter, which prompted the co-owner Ian Schrager to declare was like standing on stardust. “People got the glitter in their hair, in their socks. You would see it in people’s homes six months later, and you knew they’d been at Studio 54 on New Year’s” (I. Scharger, quoted by B. Weber).

While many celebrities (including on one infamous occasion, Cher) were deemed unworthy to be granted entry by the club’s legendary co-owner, Steve Rubell, Warhol was welcomed with open arms and would often hold court there surrounded by a retinue of long-time friends and new acquaintances. His diaries are full of entries describing arriving at the club after dinner and spending until the early hours dancing, drinking and enjoying the atmosphere. “Went over to Studio 54,” he wrote in June 1977. “The band struck up ‘New York, New York’ and they carried Liza [Minnelli] in. Halston did photos with her. Then a little later they played “New York, New York” and Martin [Scorsese] walked in, and I think maybe they carried Liza in again or picked her up again, but I was leaving” (A. Warhol, quoted by A. Warhol & P. Hackett (ed.), The Andy Warhol Diaries, New York, 1989, p. 53).

Warhol captured the glamor and excitement of Studio 54 in a series of works based on the club’s VIP ticket. The iconic logo, the disco inspired palette and the expressive energy of Warhol’s painterly additions to his silkscreen process, all speak to the hedonism and excitement of the club and its many devotees. Studio 54 was often the place where Warhol felt his happiest, being the center of attention and thoroughly enjoying the adulation. The key of the success of Studio 54, Warhol once said, is that it’s a dictatorship at the door and a democracy on the dance floor.

Handsigned lower part right

Comes with COA from the Leo Castelli Gallery and Authentication letter from the Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts

Artwork is in mint condition

Info on Andy Warhol

Andrew Warhola, Jr. (August 6, 1928 – February 22, 1987), known as Andy Warhol, was an American painter, printmaker, and filmmaker who was a leading figure in the visual art movement known as pop art. After a successful career as a commercial illustrator, Warhol became famous worldwide for his work as a painter, avant-garde filmmaker, record producer, author, and member of highly diverse social circles that included Bohemian street people, distinguished intellectuals, Hollywood celebrities and wealthy patrons.

Warhol has been the subject of numerous retrospective exhibitions, books, and feature and documentary films. He coined the widely used expression “15 minutes of fame.” In his hometown of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, The Andy Warhol Museum exists in memory of his life and artwork.

Warhol showed early artistic talent and studied commercial art at the School of Fine Arts at Carnegie Institute of Technology in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (now Carnegie Mellon University). In 1949, he moved to New York City and began a career in magazine illustration and advertising. During the 1950s, he gained fame for his whimsical ink drawings of shoe advertisements. These were done in a loose, blotted-ink style, and figured in some of his earliest showings at the Bodley Gallery in New York. With the concurrent rapid expansion of the record industry and the introduction of the vinyl record, Hi-Fi, and stereophonic recordings, RCA Records hired Warhol, along with another freelance artist, Sid Maurer, to design album covers and promotional materials.

He began exhibiting his work during the 1950s. Amongst them, were exhibitions at the Hugo Gallery, and the Bodley Gallery in New York City and in California his first one-man art gallery exhibition was on July 9 1962, in the Ferus Gallery of Los Angeles. The exhibition marked his West Coast debut in pop art. Andy Warhol’s first New York solo pop art exhibition was hosted at Eleanor Ward’s Stable Gallery November 6–24, 1962. The exhibit included the works of Marilyn Diptych, 100 Soup Cans, 100 Coke Bottles and 100 Dollar Bills. At the Stable Gallery exhibit, the artist met for the first time poet John Giorno who would star in Warhol’s first film, Sleep, in 1963.

It was during the 1960s that Warhol began to make paintings of iconic American products such as Campbell’s Soup Cans and Coca-Cola bottles, as well as paintings of celebrities such as Marilyn Monroe, Elvis Presley, Troy Donahue, Muhammad Ali and Elizabeth Taylor.

Among the imagery tackled by Warhol were dollar bills, celebrities and brand-name products. He also used as imagery for his paintings newspaper headlines or photographs of mushroom clouds, electric chairs, and police dogs attacking civil rights protesters. Warhol also used Coca-Cola bottles as subject matter for paintings.

Warhol had a re-emergence of critical and financial success from the 1970s, partially due to his affiliation and friendships with a number of prolific younger artists, who were dominating the “bull market” of ’70 & ’80s New York art: Jean-Michel Basquiat, Julian Schnabel, David Salle and other so-called Neo-Expressionists, as well as members of the Transavantgarde movement in Europe, including Francesco Clemente and Enzo Cucchi. During this time Warhol created the Michael Jackson painting signifying his success attributed to his best-selling album Thriller.

By this period, Warhol was being criticized for becoming merely a “business artist”. In 1979, reviewers disliked his exhibits of portraits of 1970s personalities and celebrities, calling them superficial, facile and commercial, with no depth or indication of the significance of the subjects. They also criticized his 1980 exhibit of 10 portraits at the Jewish Museum in New York, entitled Jewish Geniuses, which Warhol – who was uninterested in Judaism and Jews – had described in his diary as ‘They’re going to sell.’ In hindsight, however, some critics have come to view Warhol’s superficiality and commerciality as “the most brilliant mirror of our times,” contending that “Warhol had captured something irresistible about the zeitgeist of American culture in the 1970s.