George Grosz 1920’s Original Watercolor Painting ‘Three Prostitutes’

45.000,00

George Grosz 1920’s Original Watercolor Painting ‘Three Prostitutes’

Original 1920’s watercolor ‘drei Prostituierte’ on medium weight paper

Handsigned lower right corner

Sheet measures 33 x 28 cm (13.2″ x 11.2″)

Rendering erotic fantasies in visual terms is an integral part of George Grosz’s work. Bringing off a precarious balancing act between social satire, pornography and sexual libertinage, George Grosz produced a number of works that in some way or other deal with sexual obsessions. A ‘classical’ German man approaching three nude and semi-nude inviting females has sprung from erotic fantasies of the kind haunting daydreams and not just the artist’s.

Though Grosz’s images captured the seething corruption that had grown out of hyper-inflation and the political turmoil of the early 1920s, they were ill received by the authorities. Following their publication, Grosz was prosecuted for offending the sense of modesty and morality of the German public.

Grosz’s work has the objective power of Goya’s Los Caprichos, and it is remarkable that in such a hostile environment and with such provocative material he survived the wrath of those he lampooned. Writing on the volatile Germany of the 1920s, Grosz remarked that he was a minute part of this chaos…the splinter that was miraculously saved when the wood went up in the flames of barbarism.

Work was acquired in 1987 at the Sidney Janis Gallery, New York

Comes with original documentation (certificate) supplied by the Sidney Janis Gallery

Overall excellent condition

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Description

George Grosz 1920’s Original Watercolor Painting ‘Three Prostitutes’

Original 1920’s watercolor ‘drei Prostituierte’ on medium weight paper

Handsigned lower right corner

Sheet measures 33 x 28 cm (13.2″ x 11.2″)

Rendering erotic fantasies in visual terms is an integral part of George Grosz’s work. Bringing off a precarious balancing act between social satire, pornography and sexual libertinage, George Grosz produced a number of works that in some way or other deal with sexual obsessions. A ‘classical’ German man approaching three nude and semi-nude inviting females has sprung from erotic fantasies of the kind haunting daydreams and not just the artist’s.

Though Grosz’s images captured the seething corruption that had grown out of hyper-inflation and the political turmoil of the early 1920s, they were ill received by the authorities. Following their publication, Grosz was prosecuted for offending the sense of modesty and morality of the German public.

Grosz’s work has the objective power of Goya’s Los Caprichos, and it is remarkable that in such a hostile environment and with such provocative material he survived the wrath of those he lampooned. Writing on the volatile Germany of the 1920s, Grosz remarked that he was a minute part of this chaos…the splinter that was miraculously saved when the wood went up in the flames of barbarism.

Work was acquired in 1987 at the Sidney Janis Gallery, New York

Comes with original documentation (certificate) supplied by the Sidney Janis Gallery

Overall excellent condition

Information on George Grosz

George Grosz (July 26, 1893 – July 6, 1959) was a German artist known especially for his savagely caricature drawings of Berlin life in the 1920s.
He was a prominent member of the Berlin Dada and New Objectivity group during the Weimar Republic before he emigrated to the United States in 1933.
George Grosz was born Georg Ehrenfried Groß in Berlin, Germany, the son of a pub owner.

His parents were devoutly Lutheran. Grosz grew up in the Pomeranian town of Stolp.

At the urging of his cousin, the young Grosz began attending a weekly drawing class taught by a local painter named Grot.

Grosz developed his skills further by drawing meticulous copies of the drinking scenes of Eduard von Grützner, and by drawing imaginary battle scenes.

Although Grosz made his first oil paintings in 1912 while still a student, his earliest oils that can be identified today date from 1916.

By 1914, Grosz worked in a style influenced by Expressionism and Futurism, as well as by popular illustration, graffiti, and children’s drawings.

Sharply outlined forms are often treated as if transparent. The City (1916–17) was the first of his many paintings of the modern urban scene.

Other examples include the apocalyptic Explosion (1917), Metropolis (1917), and The Funeral, a 1918 painting depicting a mad funeral procession.

In his drawings, usually in pen and ink which he sometimes developed further with watercolor, Grosz did much to create the image most have of Berlin and the Weimar Republic in the 1920s.

Corpulent businessmen, wounded soldiers, prostitutes, sex crimes, and orgies were his great subjects (for example, see Fit for Active Service).

His draftsmanship was excellent although the works for which he is best known adopt a deliberately crude form of caricature.

His oeuvre includes a few absurdist works, such as Remember Uncle August the Unhappy Inventor which has buttons sewn on it and also includes a number of erotic artworks.